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that president was in cambodia right after the election. he was in burma. secretary clinton moved widely throughout the region as does secretary panetta. and the amount of activities that i do and my forces do have been a prompt jump in what we've done in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we're doing more of those things already. i think it's visible to our allies. i think it's visible to our partners. not to be invisible to the region. we also want to jump, where's the next summary our aircraft carrier, that's always the sake of. and we will, over time as you heard secretary panetta said, we will rebalance our navy towards the pacific, and i party mentioned in my opening remarks, we are rapidly moving our most capable assets in the region because of some of the ballistic missile defense will be facing of those types of things. so i think it's not about one thing. it's about a holistic approach, and what if you on the military side is only one aspect of a. it's got to be tied to what's happening in the economic side in what's happening in the diplomatic s
it is destined to be which is the single greatest nation. >> a few days after the election when republicans lifted -- mitt romney with hispanic voters, something like a 44-point gap. we need to do something on immigration. but it wasn't a couple weeks. republicans already couldn't agree on what needs to be done. how do you get your own party on the same page, let alone with the democrats did was i disagree but i don't think that's what's happened. i think what's happening is, the concept of immigration reform, and a lot of consensus. like every major piece of legislation to need to be examined. i'll give you an example. we have millions waiting to come in legally. a lot of encouragement office. they say we've done it the right way, we've waited. you were telling me that somehow if i can elegantly it would have been faster? it doesn't seem rights of people are troubled by the. that's one example of the kind of debate i think we're going to have. on the ag worker, ma guestworker, there will be a lot of debate in the democratic party. they are our labor workers who are not in favor of a guestw
for the introduction. last week at the right house, we had our first meeting since the election. it was a chance for me to banks -- thank my entire team for their service for keeping the country safe and strong. few have done more than you in that regard. that includes taking care of our remarkable men and women in uniform and their families. keeping our military the best in the world bar none. thank you for being such an outstanding secretary of defense. [applause] i am not here to give a big speech. i wanted to come by and join you in marking the 20th anniversary of one of the country's smartest and most successful national security programs. people in this room conceived it and build it. i want to a knowledge a leader who now helps guide the secretary of defense. thank you for your great work. [applause] you have to think about what real visionaries do. you look at the world and see what is missing. they set out to fill the gap. to build something new. to imagine after decades of confrontation how our nations might engage in cooperation. early in the cold war, einstein warned of the danger of our wi
would note that the president was in cam cambodia after the election, and then he was in burma, and secretary clinton moves throughout the region as well as secretary panetta, and the amount of activities i do and my forces do is a prompt jump than what we did in the past, and we're looking for opportunities to do more exercise. we are doing more of those things already, and that's viz l to the allies. i think it's visible to the partners, and i feel it visible to the region. we oftenment to jump to, well, where's the next aircraft carry your or the submarine. that's the signal. we will, over time, as you've heard secretary panetta say, rebalance towards the pacific, and i mentioned opening remarks. we're rapidly moving the most capable assets into the region because of the ballistic missile defense threats we face and those things, so it's about a holistic approach, and what i do on the military side is just one aspect of it. it's got to be tie into the economic side, what's happening in the diplomatic side, and so we're working hard that accomplishes this strategy. >> a quick
over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transform
question in the election. a clear majority of americans -- democrats, republicans and independents -- agreed with a balanced approach that asks something from everyone, but a little more from those who can most afford it. it's the only way to put our economy on a sustainable path without asking even more from the middle class. and it's the only kind of plan i'm willing to sign. everyone agrees we need to bring down our deficit and strengthen our economy for the long-term. the question is whether we can do it in a responsible way that allows us to keep investing in the things that have always made america strong. i'm convinced we can. and if both sides are willing to compromise, i believe we can give businesses and families a sense of security going into the new year. thanks, and have a great weekend. >> hello, i'm marco rubio. i have the honor of representing florida in the united states senate, and the privilege of addressing you today on behalf of my fellow republicans. our middle class has made america different from the rest of the world. every country has rich people. but only
relationship, i don't think that that kind of thing -- >> what matters is japan does have election on the summer 16th. are they worried about china trying to put together a leader democracy in the region including india because that was his strategy that if you put together things, much more like your when you think, i know you can't in your position talk one way or another about prime minister but this notion about a strategic -- is japan really need to invest in structures that balance -- are you worried that given your experience you have to balance china much more vigorously than you did in the past? >> yes. most frequently you ask question for japanese people is whether we regard china as a threat or a chance for an hour and should is would like to see china development as a chance rather than threat. >> what you think will really happen? >> there is a assumption that china continues to be kind of international stakeholder, stakeholder, international community. international order and they respect the communication with the other countries. on the assumption i think we can wel
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7